For patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, why am I staying on scene to stabilize the patient after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC)?

For patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, why am I staying on scene to stabilize the patient after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC)?

For patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, why am I staying on scene to stabilize the patient after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC)?

For patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, why am I staying on scene to stabilize the patient after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC)? 150 150 Emergency Medical Services Agency

Re-arrest is common shortly after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), occurring in approximately 60% of patients who are resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).  Particularly, during the COVID-19 pandemic, avoiding CPR en route to the facility not only improves patient outcomes, but can also reduce exposure risk for EMS providers. Nearly all patients are preload dependent after cardiac arrest and most will require vasopressor support. Rapid on-scene stabilization can prevent re-arrest by initiating volume resuscitation and preparing to administer push-dose vasopressors as needed before the epinephrine administered during resuscitation wears off and the patient begins to decompensate. Once the patient has been initially stabilized with intravenous fluids and push dose epinephrine as needed, the patient can be transferred to the nearest STEMI Receiving Center.  See Treatment Protocol 1210 Cardiac Arrest and the EMS Agency memo for more information.